The Real Great Escape

Posted: April 30, 2012 in Uncategorized

I recently watched a documentary which impressed me greatly, BBC Storyville’s ”The Real Great Escape” . There was no ground-breaking research or shock discovery, no, this had something far more impressive- beautiful cinematography. From the music (always barely heard) to the juxtaposition of old army footage, film clips and recent interviews, this programme effectively highlighted the human tragedy which lies behind the film from which it’s name comes. It quickly becomes apparent that this is not a light-hearted piece, the opening music fades and we hear the recording of a British airman who finds himself just behind enemy lines. We presume this man to be Roger himself, but this fact is actually immaterial as he successfully shows the plight of our POWs. There is something so British about the under-statement of the man’s description which serves to emphasise the horror of the situation in which he found himself. We can particularly relate to him as before we learn much else the scene changes and we are shown the man behind the myth. Roger despite his genius was a very ordinary member of his class and generation. He was the family legend, the shunned lover, the terrific dandy, the loyal friend, the brave man.  By showing a national hero warts and all, Storyville allows us to relate to him as a person, which adds power to this inspirational tale. I don’t want to say much more and ruin it for you-  I strongly urge all my readers to watch this while its still available as not all Storyville documentaries make it to DVD. Bravo BBC, Bravo.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01ghtll

 

-Anya Fitzpatrick

Hello world!

Posted: April 30, 2012 in Uncategorized

Let me begin by saying, I love television. I spent almost my entire childhood glued to the small screen, captivated. I wanted to be an actress- it was the only job in television which I was aware existed. So, age 4 I started lessons, first at Stagecoach, then at UK Theatre School and finally Live&Loud, which became Glasgow Acting Academy. I performed for 13 years and left Glasgow Acting Academy, almost an adult. This year I will no doubt take up acting again- I am not in any way bad-mouthing the acting classes I took in any way, as I developed a level of self-confidence which is unusual in a teenage girl, excellent communication skills, an inquisitive mind, a vast, unenclosed imagination, social-skills and the ability to think on my feet.

However, I knew that acting was not necessarily the career for me- I had seized upon the most obvious opportunity without looking at the industry in any depth. When I began to research the Television Industries I quickly discovered that the folly of limiting myself to one job without considering others and so I searched for something to suit me perfectly- programming. I do not yet commission programmes, but I am certain that one day it will be me who decides what you watch on television. And you will love it.

For now, you will have to make do with my ramblings on British television, so enjoy!

-Anya Fitzpatrick